How to get to Neuschwanstein Castle

Nestled in the Bavarian mountains stands the glorious Neuschwanstein Castle. I’m sure you’ve seen photos of the castle all over travel Instagram feeds, but if you’re like me, you may just be dreaming of the fairytale castle and not know how to get there. As it’s only a few hours from Munich and having been there myself, I have put together a guide on how to get to Neuschwanstein Castle.

I have dreamed of visiting King Ludwig II Neuschwanstein Castle since I first saw a picture of it on social media five years ago. I added it to my Before 30 list (#52) but never pursued the trip because the castle seemed to be in the middle of nowhere. I turned 29 this year and decided I had better start knocking a few things of my list so I knuckled down and did some research!

How to get to Neuschwanstein Castle

Turns out the castle is easy to get to from Munich and lies just outside the charming town Füssen. After a quick online search I booked an early flight for a Sunday morning from Dublin to Munich with a return late on Monday evening and reserved a room in Füssen. Three days after I turned 29 we were on our way!

If you’re like me and have always dreamed of visiting this fairytale castle but didn’t know where to start, fear not! Here’s my guide on how to get to Neuschwanstein Castle.

How to get to Neuschwanstein Castle

Book your ticket

You can book your ticket online here. The website only allows you to book more than 48 hours in advance, and I recommend booking about a week in advance if you’re on a tight schedule and need to guarantee your tour time.

If you want to witness the opulence of the inside of the castle, you have to book a tour as it is the only way to gain access. During the high season being spontaneous is extremely risky as tickets sell out very fast. We went in March and stayed locally so we could afford to be flexible and just show up, but in general it is recommended that you book ahead to avoid disappointment.

Get the train from Munich Hauptbahnhof (HBF) to Füssen

It was really easy to get to FĂĽssen. At the airport we purchased a Bayern-Ticket – a transit day-pass for Bavaria. We were able to use the ticket from the airport to Munich Hauptbahnhof and then on to FĂĽssen from there.

There are solid lines on the ticket where you need to write your name and the names of all other passengers traveling with you. The first time we bought a ticket the lady pointed this out to us – the second time a different salesperson failed to mention it. The conductor will check for the signature when he stamps your ticket.

At €31 for the two of us we were delighted. I’ve listed the pricing scheme below:

Price of the Bayern-Ticket 1 traveller EUR 25, for every person more additionally EUR 6,- (max. 5 adults). For example,
valid for 1 person EUR 25
valid for 2 persons EUR 31
valid for 3 persons EUR 37
valid for 4 persons EUR 43
valid for 5 persons EUR 49

How to get to Neuschwanstein Castle

Trains for FĂĽssen were about every hour. Just check the departures board in the station for your platform number. The platforms for FĂĽssen are at the far right when facing the trains. We didn’t realise this and ended up missing the first train we wanted by a minute. There was a couple of sit-in food options inside the station so we killed time and had some dinner.

The train ride takes approximately two hours. The journey is comfortable with great views, plenty of space, and washrooms on board. We got some snacks at the station and settled in.

How to get to Neuschwanstein Castle From Füssen

The FĂĽssen station is small and easy to navigate. The busses and taxis are in the parking lot (right of the platform). If it’s a nice day and you have time to spare, you can walk the 5km to the ticket centre. Alternatively, take bus 73 or 78 and show the driver your Bayern train ticket.

The bus will take about 10 minutes.  When you arrive, walk uphill where the ticket centre is located and go through the reserved line if you booked ahead or queue up if you’re being spontaneous. You’ll need to pick up your ticket at least 90 minutes before your tour time, otherwise they cancel your reservation.

A tour ticket costs € 13.80 a person (under 18s go free!)

How to get to Neuschwanstein Castle
Fussen Train Station

How to get to Neuschwanstein Castle From The Ticket Centre 

Walk! You’re here for the day and it’s a lovely stroll with views of the castle. They say it takes 30-40 minutes but it only took us a maximum of 20 minutes, and that was with us stopping for a few photo ops. Regardless, if you’ve booked ahead you will collect your tickets 90 minutes early so you will have plenty of time to get to the castle.

How to get to Neuschwanstein Castle

I know walking isn’t an option for everyone, but don’t worry, there are few other choices:

– Horse carriage: €6 uphill and €3 downhill.

– Shuttle bus: €2.60 return trip. However the shuttles aren’t very frequent so you could be waiting awhile before you’re on the way.

From where the transport drops you off, it’s another 10 minute walk uphill. (There’s a bridge at this point where you can get the Instagram shot of the castle, however it was closed when we visited).

How to get to Neuschwanstein Castle: horse carriage

The Tour

You’ve made it to the top! After you’ve taken a few shots of the castle and maybe had a beer or mulled wine from the tourist kiosk, check the time and proceed to the castle gate. On your ticket is your tour number. At the entrance of the castle, there’s a gate with a screen showing tour numbers and you can enter ONLY once your number is called.

The tour itself is guided and now is your chance to learn the history of King Ludwig II and Neuschwanstein Castle. Lasting about 30 minutes, you only see a few rooms as a large portion of the castle is incomplete, but the grandeur is worth witnessing. You can’t take any photos inside the castle but there’s an amazing view from a terrace at the end of the tour where you can get a few stunning shots.

How to get to Neuschwanstein Castle
View from the Castle

If you’re heading back to Munich, just retrace your steps and you’re there! We chose to stay the night in FĂĽssen and got to enjoy a great spa with a view of the castle (if you’re interested in spa holidays check out my post: Slovakian Spa Holiday.)

Overall, we thoroughly enjoyed the journey and managed to pack in a ton of activity into our one-night getaway.

I hope this post encourages you to check out this historic castle that inspired Walt Disney. Now you know how to get to Neuschwanstein Castle!

How to get to Neuschwanstein Castle

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24 hours in Edinburgh

Do you ever think about other lifetimes? I’ve been fortunate enough to have serendipitously met a few people in my life that I have instantly bonded with. Bosom friends. Sister from another mister. Love at first laugh. There’s that moment when you connect so quickly it feels like you’ve known one another your whole lives. You can go years without seeing each other and get along better than most of the people you’ve met in the same amount of time. Almost like you’ve done this so called life together before.

Ok, enough of the philosophy. If I go too far down the rabbit hole there’s no going back! After not seeing each other for seven years, my friend Elyse spontaneously decided to visit me in Dublin for a week. She’s never been to Europe before so we managed to squeeze in a quick two night trip in Edinburgh. Elyse is the first person I met at university. Some random “soph” (Definition: overly excited second year student trying desperately to relive their first year) pulled me out of the car at my new residence and proceeded to force introductions with a handful of other students who were pulled out of their cars at the same time. Thankfully, Elyse was the first person I met and we connected as soon as we discovered we were both in the same media program. We ended up spending way too much time together as we found each other equally hilarious (surprisingly, not many others shared this disposition). From thereonin we ended up living in a share house with three other hilarious girls. After spending time with each other nearly every day of the school year for four years, I decided to take off to Australia, then British Columbia, then Ireland, until suddenly we hadn’t seen each other for seven years.  We picked up exactly where we left off and made for great travel companions. Fast forward to an adventure in Edinburgh.

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Reunited and it feels so good!

I’ve had the pleasure of visiting Edinburgh four times. Every time I go as soon as I get a glimpse of the city all I can think about is how amazing it would be to live there. Panoramic views of breath-taking Victorian architecture is a treat for the eyes and a boost to the creative soul.

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Edinburgh Old Town. Photo Credit: Elyse Booth

Edinburgh is a city that just makes sense. I’d imagine that the architects were inspired by the natural landscape and weather since the buildings are even more beautiful when it’s windy, cloudy and drizzling. Whenever I’ve gone I’ve only had one or two days to explore, so I’ve put together a little list of what to do in the city in 24 hours.

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Strolling around the city. Photo Credit: Elyse Booth

FIVE THINGS TO DO-3

  1. Walk the entire Royal Mile
    The Royal Mile is the name given to a succession of streets in the Old Town. The stretch between two significant historic locations, Edinburgh Castle and Holyrood Palace, is the ultimate place to imagine medieval life. You can walk right up to the gates of Edinburgh Castle, and if you can spare the time, tour the inside for £17. On the opposite end you’ll find the Palace of Holyroodhouse, which is the official residence of Queen Elizabeth II, who spends a week residing there every summer. You can visit the palace for £14.

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    View of the Castle at the end of the Royal Mile. We. got this shot from the tower of the camera obscura. Photo Credit: Elyse Booth
  2. Arthur’s Seat
    A hill located at the end of the Royal Mile, climbing Arthur’s seat is a great way to spend a couple of hours when visiting Edinburgh. A relatively easy climb (my legs only hurt for one day after), you’ll get a chance to catch your breath while getting amazing panoramic views at the top. I’ve climbed Arthur’s Seat three times and would do it again next time I visit Edinburgh. Arthur’s Seat is the largest of three sites of the Arthur’s Seat Volcano site. Like the location of the castle, its formation is the site of an extinct volcano system.

    IMG_4365
    We made it to the top!
  3. Whiskey and Wine
    Head out to either the Old Town or the New Town and try a unique Scotch you’d never get to try elsewhere. There are so many to choose from it can be a bit overwhelming. There are lot of good whiskeys to try at affordable prices so just go for something you’ve never had before. Besides that, Elyse and I came across a couple of great wine bars. We especially liked Smith and Gertrude in the New Town. You can choose different artisan cheeses ranging from £3.50 to £4.50 and cured meats from £4.50-£5.50. Or you can do what we did and order a mixed board of cheese and charcuterie (three of each) for £16. So.Good. We also treated ourselves to a great bottle of  Langhe Nebbiolo, La Ca Nova for £30.

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    Smith and Gertrude
  4. Camera Obscura
    If you’re short on time, visiting the camera obscura is a brilliant way of getting your bearings in the city. A Victorian style virtual tour, you are guided through the Unesco World Heritage site that is Edinburgh from a tiny dark room. Tickets are ÂŁ15.50 for adults and they’re valid all day so you can come and go as you please. There are some great photo opportunities from the top of the building as well.
  5. Walk Princess Street (and Primark!)
    On the south side of Princess Street you get amazing views of the Castle perched atop the volcanic site, giving the illusion of the castle blending in to the rock as if it’s part of the earth itself. There’s also a massive gothic monument to Sir Walter Scott, the stunning Balmoral Hotel, and the Princess Street Gardens. On the other side, you’ve got your high street shops. Ladies and gents, there is some serious Primark action happening on this street. Sprawling over about 5 floors, if you fancy a bit of shopping you’ll find some stellar deals. If you’re a Harry Potter fan, there is always a ton of paraphernalia to choose from (pyjamas, socks, notebooks, etc).

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    View of the castle at night from Princess Street. As soon as we got off the bus in the city we were greeted with this view. Photo credit: Elyse Booth
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    Photo credit: Elyse Booth

    We did all five of the things on the list (but didn’t go inside the castle or palace) in 24 hours and had a great time. Next time I’m there I plan to check out the galleries, museums, and evening ghost tour.

The travel details:

  • Ryanair return flight from Dublin for €50
  • Two nights in a twin room at the Edinburgh City Hotel for ÂŁ111 (ÂŁ55.50/person)
  • Return air coach transport from Airport to Edinburgh City ÂŁ7 (this bus leaves every 10/15 minutes. Great service).
  • The city is very walkable and we didn’t need public transit or taxis at all.

Edinburgh is wildly beautiful. In my opinion it’s an underrated gem in the United Kingdom. It seems almost unfair for so many gorgeous buildings to be located in such close vicinity, and it’s a pleasure to visit every single time.

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Walking through the Old Town on our way to breakfast at The City Cafe. Photo credit: Elyse Booth
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Photo credit: Elyse Booth
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Photo credit: Elyse Booth
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Photo credit: Elyse Booth
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Doesn’t it look like the castle is a part of the hill? Photo credit: Elyse Booth
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Photo credit: Elyse Booth

24 Hour Holiday – Top 5 Ways to Spend Time in Edinburgh Scotland

Do you ever think about other lifetimes? I’ve been fortunate enough to have serendipitously met a few people in my life that I have instantly bonded with. Bosom friends. Sister from another mister. Love at first laugh. There’s that moment when you connect so quickly it feels like you’ve known one another your whole lives. You can go years without seeing each other and get along better than most of the people you’ve met in the same amount of time. Almost like you’ve done this so-called life together before. Ok, enough of the philosophy. If I go too far down the rabbit hole there’s no going back! After not seeing each other for seven years, my friend Elyse spontaneously decided to visit me in Dublin for a week. She’s never been to Europe before so we managed to squeeze in a quick trip to spend some time in Edinburgh Scotland.

(If you don’t fancy reading a little story about university life, scroll down to my top five ways to spend time in Edinburgh Scotland).

Elyse is the first person I met at university. Some random “soph” (Definition: overly excited second-year student trying desperately to relive their first year) pulled me out of the car at my new residence and proceeded to force introductions with a handful of other students who were pulled out of their cars at the same time. Thankfully, Elyse was the first person I met and we connected as soon as we discovered we were both in the same media program. We ended up spending way too much time together as we found each other equally hilarious (surprisingly, not many others shared this disposition).

From thereon in, we ended up living in a share house with three other hilarious girls. After spending time with each other nearly every day of the school year for four years, I decided to take off to Australia, then British Columbia, then Ireland, until suddenly we hadn’t seen each other for seven years. We picked up exactly where we left off and made for great travel companions. Fast forward to an adventure in Edinburgh.

our time in edinburgh scotland, two females having a great time exploring edinburgh, scotland
Reunited and it feels so good! (Elyse on the left and Grace (author) on the right)

I’ve had the pleasure of spending time in Edinburgh Scotland four times. Every time I go as soon as I get a glimpse of the city all I can think about is how amazing it would be to live there. Panoramic views of breath-taking Victorian architecture is a treat for the eyes and a boost to the creative soul.

Edinburgh is a city that just makes sense. I’d imagine that the architects were inspired by the natural landscape and weather since the buildings are even more beautiful when it’s windy, cloudy and drizzling. Whenever I’ve gone I’ve only had one or two days to explore, so I’ve put together a little list of what to do in the city in 24 hours.

Our time in edinburgh, scotland - the view of the city streets in edinburgh
Edinburgh Old Town. Photo Credit: Elyse Booth
woman walking down the cobbled streets enjoying her time in edinburgh, scotland
Strolling around the city. Photo Credit: Elyse Booth

FIVE THINGS TO DO when you spend time in Edinburgh Scotland

My Top 5 Ways to Spend Time in Edinburgh Scotland

 

1. Walk the entire Royal Mile

The Royal Mile is the name given to a succession of streets in the Old Town. The stretch between two significant historic locations, Edinburgh Castle and Holyrood Palace, is the ultimate place to imagine medieval life. You can walk right up to the gates of Edinburgh Castle, and if you can spare the time, tour the inside for £17. On the opposite end you’ll find the Palace of Holyroodhouse, which is the official residence of Queen Elizabeth II, who spends a week residing there every summer. You can visit the palace for £14.

DSC_9419.jpg
View of the Castle at the end of the Royal Mile. We. got this shot from the tower of the camera obscura. We had the best time in Edinburgh Scotland! Photo Credit: Elyse Booth

2. Arthur’s Seat

A hill located at the end of the Royal Mile, climbing Arthur’s seat is a great way to spend your time in Edinburgh Scotland. A relatively easy climb (my legs only hurt for one day after), you’ll get a chance to catch your breath while getting amazing panoramic views at the top. I’ve climbed Arthur’s Seat three times and would do it again next time I visit Edinburgh. Arthur’s Seat is the largest of three sites of the Arthur’s Seat Volcano site. Like the location of the castle, its formation is the site of an extinct volcano system.

IMG_4365
We made it to the top!

3. Whiskey and Wine: Restaurants in Edinburgh Scotland

Head out to either the Old Town or the New Town and try a unique Scotch you’d never get to try elsewhere. There are so many to choose from it can be a bit overwhelming. There are a lot of good whiskeys to try at affordable prices so just go for something you’ve never had before. Besides that, Elyse and I came across a couple of great wine bars. We especially liked Smith and Gertrude in the New Town. You can choose different artisan cheeses ranging from ÂŁ3.50 to ÂŁ4.50 and cured meats from ÂŁ4.50-ÂŁ5.50. Or you can do what we did and order a mixed board of cheese and charcuterie (three of each) for ÂŁ16. So.Good. We also treated ourselves to a great bottle of Langhe Nebbiolo, La Ca Nova for ÂŁ30. I can’t think of a better way to enjoy our time in Edinburgh Scotland. Can you?

IMG_4436
Smith and Gertrude

4. Camera Obscura

If you’re short on time, visiting the camera obscura is a brilliant way of getting your bearings in the city. A Victorian style virtual tour, you are guided through the Unesco World Heritage site that is Edinburgh from a tiny dark room. Tickets are ÂŁ15.50 for adults and they’re valid all day so you can come and go as you please. There are some great photo opportunities from the top of the building as well.

5. Walk Princess Street (and Primark!)

On the south side of Princess Street you get amazing views of the Castle perched atop the volcanic site, giving the illusion of the castle blending in to the rock as if it’s part of the earth itself. There’s also a massive gothic monument to Sir Walter Scott, the stunning Balmoral Hotel, and the Princess Street Gardens. On the other side, you’ve got your high street shops. Ladies and gents, there is some serious Primark action happening on this street. Sprawling over about 5 floors, if you fancy a bit of shopping you’ll find some stellar deals. If you’re a Harry Potter fan, there is always a ton of paraphernalia to choose from (pyjamas, socks, notebooks, etc).

DSC_9237.jpg
View of the castle at night from Princess Street. As soon as we got off the bus in the city we were greeted with this view. Photo credit: Elyse Booth
DSC_9247.jpg
Photo credit: Elyse Booth

We did all five of the things on the list (but didn’t go inside the castle or palace) in 24 hours and had a great time. Next time I’m there I plan to check out the galleries, museums, and evening ghost tour.

The Travel Details:

  • Ryanair return flight from Dublin for €50
  • Where to stay in Edinburgh Scotland: Two nights in a twin room at the Edinburgh City Hotel for ÂŁ111 (ÂŁ55.50/person)
  • Return air coach transport from Airport to Edinburgh City ÂŁ7 (this bus leaves every 10/15 minutes. Great service).
  • The city is very walkable and we didn’t need public transit or taxis at all.

Edinburgh is wildly beautiful. In my opinion, it’s an underrated gem in the United Kingdom. It seems almost unfair for so many gorgeous buildings to be located in such close vicinity, and it’s a pleasure to visit every single time.

DSC_9288.jpg
Walking through the Old Town on our way to breakfast at The City Cafe. Photo credit: Elyse Booth
DSC_9308.jpg
Photo credit: Elyse Booth
DSC_9304.jpg
Photo credit: Elyse Booth
DSC_9444.jpg
Photo credit: Elyse Booth
DSC_9277.jpg
Doesn’t it look like the castle is a part of the hill? Photo credit: Elyse Booth
DSC_9449.jpg
Photo credit: Elyse Booth

Are you interested in travel? Check out my time in Slovakia – winter spa weekend. 

Part two: Crossing off the Counties – Clare and Sligo

An hour and a half later we were wandering around Bunratty Castle and Heritage Park. We climbed narrow staircases, posed on thrones, and toured the replica old village.

From Bunratty we made our through the narrow, winding roads of County Clare. We stayed in a little village called Ennistymon. The Falls Hotel, perched on a hill with glorious steps leading up to it, had waterfalls and a stream out back and donkeys roaming around the front. We checked in and immediately made our way to the leisure centre. The outdoor jacuzzi was my favourite – surrounded by crisp air, tree branches, and a waterfall. As it lashed rain that night we crossed our fingers and prayed for sunshine for the following day.

The next morning we prepared for the day by overeating at the breakfast buffet – we needed our energy for hiking! As we drove to the Cliffs of Moher the sun broke through the clouds and decided to stay awhile.

Standing 214m (702 feet) at their highest point the Cliffs of Moher stretch for 8 kilometres (5 miles) along the Atlantic coast of County Clare in the west of Ireland. From the Cliffs of Moher on a clear day one can see the Aran Islands and Galway Bay, as well as the Twelve Pins and the Maum Turk mountains in Connemara, Loop Head to the south and the Dingle Peninsula and Blasket Islands in Kerry. O’Brien’s Tower stands near the highest point and has served as a viewing point for visitors for hundreds of years. (www.cliffsofmoher.ie)

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It was a view that I can’t imagine you would ever tire of. The grande vastness and sickening height made me feel minuscule, while simultaneously filling me with awe at how great our world is and an overwhelming sensation of gratefulness and respect. It is a profound privilege to experience the worlds wonders.

You may knows the Cliffs from Harry Potter or The Princess Bride. The Cliffs of Insanity is an accurate description! I made sure to stay far from the fence free edge and had to clasp on to my neighbour and look away while Steve kept inching closer and closer to “insanity”.

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The Cliffs of Insanity!

With all that fear and bewilderment we worked up an appetite so we headed back to the car park, looked up directions, and put the car in drive. Suddenly some German people started waving at us frantically and yelled at us to stop. “Your tire, it’s flat!” We all climbed out of the car and sure enough the tire is as flat as can be, can’t get any flatter. One tour bus driver hung around and gave us a few helpful hints while the lads changed the tire. The boys got the coat offs, busted out the jack, and  proceeded to change the tire in the middle of the car park. At least it wasn’t raining!

Afterwards we carried on to Doolin, the village famously know for the birthplace of Irish music. We had some tasty fish and image_7chips and the most perfect pint of Guinness I’ve ever had. We also found a man who specializes in tire repairs. It seemed that punctured tires is an incredibly common occurrence in Clare. We came back to Doolin that night to take in some trad music. There were six musicians, all ages, sitting in a booth jamming away. No singing, just the traditional Irish instruments.

The next day we dropped Steve off at the train station and carried on to Sligo. We planned a pit stop in Galway city where we got stuck in major traffic then finally had a quick stroll around. It was interesteing seeing the scenery change from Clare to Sligo, even noticing the differences in the old stone fences. Sligo town is surrounded by lovely mountains (or hills, as we’d call them in Canada). That night we met up with an old friend, Jimmy, who brought us for dinner and then later hosted us at his perfect little bar, Lillies. The following day we met Jimmy and he showed us around the town and gave us a bit of a history lesson. We managed to find the Anglican church that my great, great grandparents were married in.

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The church in Sligo

Back in Dublin we prepared for a night out in search of live music. We started at The Odeon then wandered further in to town and turned up empty. We decided to swing by Sweeney’s to say hi to Steve. Appearance wise Sweeney’s is a bit of a dive music venue, but it’s incredibly popular and always full of every demographic you can imagine. Dad was instantly a legend for these people. Drunk lads would stumble up to him and make a fuss about his hat. One guy kept complimenting how well dad pulled it off. Another guy kept walking past him, then say something to his friend, then stare at him. This went on until he worked up the courage to ask my dad if he could wear his hat to pose for a picture. My dad said to him very seriously that he couldn’t run off with it, to which he adamantly reassured over and over that he would never, EVER, do such a thing. The moment he had the hat on his head his face lit up and he looked like the happiest person in the world. The guy and his friends then insisted on taking a picture with my dad, going on about how he was the sickest geezer ever. That’s pretty much the gist of my night out “clubbing” with my legend of a father.

Traveling provides perspective and a refreshing change in routine life. We had some hilarious moments along the way and the journey seemed to be over in the blink of an eye.

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A quick stop in Galway
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A perfect pint in Doolin
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Bunratty folk park
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Sligo
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Siblings…

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That’s a wrap.

Part two: Crossing off the Irish Counties – Clare and Sligo

An hour and a half later we were wandering around Bunratty Castle and Heritage Park. We climbed narrow staircases, posed on thrones, and toured the replica old village.

From Bunratty we made our through the narrow, winding roads of County Clare. We stayed in a little village called Ennistymon. The Falls Hotel, perched on a hill with glorious steps leading up to it, had waterfalls and a stream out back and donkeys roaming around the front. We checked in and immediately made our way to the leisure centre. The outdoor jacuzzi was my favourite – surrounded by crisp air, tree branches, and a waterfall. As it lashed rain that night we crossed our fingers and prayed for sunshine for the following day.

The next morning we prepared for the day by overeating at the breakfast buffet – we needed our energy for hiking! As we drove to the Cliffs of Moher the sun broke through the clouds and decided to stay awhile.

Cliffs of Moher

Standing 214m (702 feet) at their highest point the Cliffs of Moher stretch for 8 kilometres (5 miles) along the Atlantic coast of County Clare in the west of Ireland. From the Cliffs of Moher on a clear day one can see the Aran Islands and Galway Bay, as well as the Twelve Pins and the Maum Turk mountains in Connemara, Loop Head to the south and the Dingle Peninsula and Blasket Islands in Kerry. O’Brien’s Tower stands near the highest point and has served as a viewing point for visitors for hundreds of years. (www.cliffsofmoher.ie)

image_5

It was a view that I can’t imagine you would ever tire of. The grande vastness and sickening height made me feel minuscule, while simultaneously filling me with awe at how great our world is and an overwhelming sensation of gratefulness and respect. It is a profound privilege to experience the worlds wonders.

You may knows the Cliffs from Harry Potter or The Princess Bride. The Cliffs of Insanity is an accurate description! I made sure to stay far from the fence free edge and had to clasp on to my neighbour and look away while Steve kept inching closer and closer to “insanity”.

image_1
The Cliffs of Insanity!

With all that fear and bewilderment we worked up an appetite so we headed back to the car park, looked up directions, and put the car in drive. Suddenly some German people started waving at us frantically and yelled at us to stop. “Your tire, it’s flat!” We all climbed out of the car and sure enough the tire is as flat as can be, can’t get any flatter. One tour bus driver hung around and gave us a few helpful hints while the lads changed the tire. The boys got the coat offs, busted out the jack, and  proceeded to change the tire in the middle of the car park. At least it wasn’t raining!

Afterwards we carried on to Doolin, the village famously know for the birthplace of Irish music. We had some tasty fish and image_7chips and the most perfect pint of Guinness I’ve ever had. We also found a man who specializes in tire repairs. It seemed that punctured tires is an incredibly common occurrence in Clare. We came back to Doolin that night to take in some trad music. There were six musicians, all ages, sitting in a booth jamming away. No singing, just the traditional Irish instruments.

The next day we dropped Steve off at the train station and carried on to Sligo. We planned a pit stop in Galway city where we got stuck in major traffic then finally had a quick stroll around. It was interesteing seeing the scenery change from Clare to Sligo, even noticing the differences in the old stone fences. Sligo town is surrounded by lovely mountains (or hills, as we’d call them in Canada). That night we met up with an old friend, Jimmy, who brought us for dinner and then later hosted us at his perfect little bar, Lillies. The following day we met Jimmy and he showed us around the town and gave us a bit of a history lesson. We managed to find the Anglican church that my great, great grandparents were married in.

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The church in Sligo

Back in Dublin we prepared for a night out in search of live music. We started at The Odeon then wandered further in to town and turned up empty. We decided to swing by Sweeney’s to say hi to Steve. Appearance wise Sweeney’s is a bit of a dive music venue, but it’s incredibly popular and always full of every demographic you can imagine. Dad was instantly a legend for these people. Drunk lads would stumble up to him and make a fuss about his hat. One guy kept complimenting how well dad pulled it off. Another guy kept walking past him, then say something to his friend, then stare at him. This went on until he worked up the courage to ask my dad if he could wear his hat to pose for a picture. My dad said to him very seriously that he couldn’t run off with it, to which he adamantly reassured over and over that he would never, EVER, do such a thing. The moment he had the hat on his head his face lit up and he looked like the happiest person in the world. The guy and his friends then insisted on taking a picture with my dad, going on about how he was the sickest geezer ever. That’s pretty much the gist of my night out “clubbing” with my legend of a father.

Traveling provides perspective and a refreshing change in routine life. We had some hilarious moments along the way and the journey seemed to be over in the blink of an eye.

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A quick stop in Galway
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A perfect pint in Doolin
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Sligo
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Siblings…

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That’s a wrap.